CSCCE’s Community Profiles Project: First round of profiles now out!

Today we’re launching the first outputs from a project that we’ve been working on this year to better characterize communities in science – and to support scientific community managers, their leadership, and funders to meaningfully compare some of the current activities taking place across the broad landscape of STEM community projects.

The CSCCE community profiles project has resulted in the creation of an initial collection of 13 community profiles – two page PDFs capturing core features of each community from staffing to programming and funding sources. We collected the data using a custom, detailed survey and then translated what we found to a standardized profile template, which was specifically created for this project. The resulting profiles, which incorporate CSCCE’s own frameworks for describing communities and community member engagement, allow easy comparison between different scientific communities. 

In this post we introduce the rationale for the project and highlight the first 13 profiles. In Thursday’s post, we outline how the project was carried out.

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February’s Community Call – help us to launch our Community Profiles project

Our next CSCCE Community Call is on Wednesday 19th February at 2pm Eastern. Join us to discuss how we’re going to be creating Community Profiles to help connect scientific community managers with others doing similar things – and how to make the profiles useful to you!

Introducing the Community Profiles project

Some of the questions that we get asked most often about scientific community management go along the lines of “I’m looking to launch a new community focused on X. Can you tell me about another organization that’s already done this?” or “We’re looking to expand our community programming to include Y. Are there any best practices about how to do this – or things we should absolutely avoid?”

To help our community members to answer these questions more directly themselves, we’re looking to create a series of downloadable Community Profiles. At this concept stage (read: plans may evolve as we test and iterate!) we envisage that the profiles will be very visual, two-page summary sheets with some vital stats about specific communities that have agreed to be featured. As a user, you’ll be able to compare communities with similar audiences, online tools, programming and more – and possibly also reach out to their community manager to ask any follow up questions.

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Scientific Community Profiles

Scientific communities can come in a range of different configurations – from those hosted by professional associations to large-scale research collaborations. The CSCCE Community Profiles provide a snapshot of each community featured – highlighting key demographics, programming, funding and what community management looks like.

Background

This project was conceived and led by CSCCE’s Director, Lou Woodley, with significant input from CSCCE’s Communications Director, Katie Pratt in the development of the final profiles. Sara Kobilka, an independent consultant, worked with us on survey design and data gathering and analysis. The Community Profiles working group gave valuable feedback on survey design and profile layout throughout the project.

Goals of the project

The word “community” has been broadly adopted by many organizations to describe groups that range from newsletter recipients to highly active working groups. And these configurations may reflect different goals, stages of maturity, and levels of community management support. This can make it hard for you as a community manager, senior manager or funder to know what’s possible with the resources you have available. We initiated this project in order to:

  • Support existing scientific community managers in finding information and inspiration from other community efforts – including community managers to reach out to.
  • Start standardizing the way that scientific communities are described to allow easier comparison and setting of expectations – by community managers, senior managers, funders and evaluators.
  • Share observations and make recommendations based on what we learn from our taxonomy development and gathering of data.

How the project was carried out

Planning for the CSCCE Community Profiles started in 2019 and the work on the first round of 13 profiles took place in 2020. Data was gathered using a custom survey – developed with the support of the CSCCE community profiles working group – and translated into a standardized profile template to allow comparison between the featured communities. The resultant profiles, which incorporate CSCCE’s own frameworks for describing communities and community member engagement, are available for download from the links below.

We welcome feedback on the first version of these profiles and hope to expand and update the collection, based on demand. If you would like to work with us to create a profile about your own community please fill out this short form, or contact us at info@cscce.org with any other questions.

Further information

Community Profile: CSCCE’s Community of Practice

by Lou Woodley, Katie Pratt, Sara Kobilka

September 22, 2020

This CSCCE Community Profile features CSCCE’s community of practice. Data was provided by Lou Woodley, Center Director.

COMING SOON | Community Profile: The Carpentries

by Lou Woodley, Katie Pratt, Sara Kobilka, Serah Njambi Rono

This CSCCE Community Profile features The Carpentries. Data was provided by Serah Njambi Rono, Director of Community Development and Engagement.

Community Profile: Arctic Data Center

by Lou Woodley, Katie Pratt, Sara Kobilka, Erin McLean

September 22, 2020

This CSCCE Community Profile features the Arctic Data Center at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS). Data was provided by Erin McLean, Community Engagement and Outreach Coordinator.

Community Profile: The Academic Data Science Alliance

by Lou Woodley, Katie Pratt, Sara Kobilka, Steve Van Tuyl

September 22, 2020

This CSCCE Community Profile features the Academic Data Science Alliance. Data was provided by Steve Van Tuyl, Community Coordinator.

Community Profile: Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network

by Lou Woodley, Katie Pratt, Sara Kobilka, Marty Downs

September 22, 2020

This CSCCE Community Profile features the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network. Data was provided by Marty Downs, Director, LTER Network Office.

Community Profile: Community for Data Integration, US Geological Survey

by Lou Woodley, Katie Pratt, Sara Kobilka, Leslie Hsu

September 22, 2020

This CSCCE Community Profile features the Community for Data Integration (CDI) at the US Geological Survey (USGS). Data was provided by Leslie Hsu, Coordinator.

Community Profile: Microbiome Research Community, Lawrence Berkeley Lab

by Lou Woodley, Katie Pratt, Sara Kobilka, Pajau Vangay

September 22, 2020

This CSCCE Community Profile features the Microbiome Data Community, Lawrence Berkeley Lab. Data was provided by Pajau Vangay, Community Engagement Manager.

Community Profile: Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP)

by Lou Woodley, Katie Pratt, Sara Kobilka, Megan Carter

September 22, 2020

This CSCCE Community Profile features Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP). Data was provided by Megan Carter, Director of Community.

COMING SOON | Community Profile: UK Research Software Engineering community

by Lou Woodley, Katie Pratt, Sara Kobilka, Claire Wyatt

September 22, 2020

This CSCCE Community Profile features the UK Research Software Engineering community. Data was provided by Claire Wyatt, Community Manager.

Community Profile: Urban @UW, University of Washington

by Lou Woodley, Katie Pratt, Sara Kobilka, Jennifer Davison

September 22, 2020

This CSCCE Community Profile features Urban @uW at the University of Washington. Data was provided by Jennifer Davison, interim Executive Director.

Community Profile: Advanced Science Research Center, City University of New York

by Lou Woodley, Katie Pratt, Sara Kobilka, Annette “Nina” Gray

September 22, 2020

This CSCCE Community Profile features the Advanced Science Research Community (ASRC) at City University of New York (CUNY). Data was provided by Annette “Nina” Gray, Executive Director.

Community Profile: Deaf and Hard of Hearing Virtual Academic Community (DHHVAC)

by Lou Woodley, Katie Pratt, Sara Kobilka, Rebecca Carpenter

September 22, 2020

This CSCCE Community Profile features the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Virtual Academic Community (DHHVAC) at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT). Data was provided by Rebecca Carpenter, Community Manager.

Community Profile: preLights, Company of Biologists

by Lou Woodley, Katie Pratt, Sara Kobilka, Mate Palfy

September 22, 2020

This CSCCE Community Profile features preLights, by the Company of Biologists. Data was provided by Mate Palfy, Community Manager.

Why do academics use social networking sites?

This post, written by CSCCE Director Lou Woodley, takes a look at the motivations of academics who use social networking tools.

Person using a laptop
Browsing” by Nick Olejniczak under CC BY-NC 2.0

Last week our team took a quick look at a recent paper, which asks “Why do academics use academic social networking sites?” The paper presents the results of a survey of 81 researchers at three Israeli institutes who were asked about their motivations for using ResearchGate and Academia.edu.

The survey draws upon the Uses and Gratifications theory from the field of media studies for its research questions – exploring whether the five broad motivations for media consumers may also apply to academics that use online professional networks. Here we outline that theory and then highlight some of the findings from the paper.

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What’s Community Engagement in science? And why does it matter? Q&A with Lou Woodley

Two weeks ago we announced the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows program. Following on from that, Program Director (and Trellis’ Community Engagement Director) Lou Woodley answered some great questions from Matt Shipman on the Communication Breakdown blog. The conversation is cross-posted below.

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