Community Calls

As part of our programming to nurture a community of scientific community engagement managers and those interested in scientific community engagement, we host a monthly community call via Zoom.

Providing support for scientific community managers remains at the heart of CSCCE’s mission. Image credit: CSCCE

2021 schedule

(You can find the archive of Community Call info from 2019 and 2020 here)

We typically host our community calls at 11am EST on the third Wednesday of each month, although speaker availability may result in scheduling changes. Abstracts and speakers will be updated as the schedule is co-created. The listings below reflect the most up-to-date information.

We welcome input about the topics for discussion – both ahead of time and during the calls. Please let us know if you’d like to present – or suggest a new topic for a call!

We will also share information about our community calls in our monthly newsletter.

December 2021 Community Call

Date: Wednesday, 15 December at 11am EDT

Topic: Annual community potluck

Blog posts: Coming soon

Zoom link: join here

More details

ABSTRACT

Coming soon.

November 2021 Community Call

Date: Wednesday, 17 November at 11am EDT

Topic: Community governance models

Blog posts: November’s community call | Recap

More details

ABSTRACT

Join November’s Community Call to:

  • Learn about different models of community governance
  • Explore the STEM community ecosystem and the implementation of different governance models
  • Consider how your community runs, and reflect on whether there are ways you could adjust your governance model to be more inclusive, sustainable, or otherwise meet the needs of your members and/or staff

SPEAKERS

  • Alycia Crall, The Carpentries
  • Lou Woodley, CSCCE

October 2021 Community Call

Date: Wednesday, 20 October at 11am EDT

Topic: Community champions

Blog posts: October’s community call | Recap

More details

ABSTRACT

Join October’s Community Call to:

  • Find out what a community champion is, and why supporting champions is important for maintaining, growing, and/or evolving your community
  • Explore the ways community champions benefit communities, by adding capacity, legitimacy, and/or reach
  • Hear from community managers who are currently running champions programs, and how they have designed these programs to benefit both their organization and the champions themselves

SPEAKERS

  • Vanessa Fairhurst, Crossref
  • Ailis O’Carroll, eLife
  • Iratxe Puebla, ASAPbio

September 2021 Community Call

Date: Wednesday, 22 September at 11am EDT

Topic: Quarterly programming update

Blog posts: September’s community call

More details

ABSTRACT

Join September’s Community Call to:

  • Find out how you can get involved in CSCCE community programming
  • Meet our newest team member
  • Learn more about our plans for the future
  • Connect with your community

July 2021 Community Call

Date: Wednesday, 21 July at 11am EDT

Topic: CSCCE community profiles round 2

Blog posts: July’s community call | Recap

More details

ABSTRACT

Join July’s Community Call to:

  • Learn more about our research into STEM communities and the people who support them
  • Hear from four members of the CSCCE community of practice, the communities they work with, and how creating a CSCCE profile has impacted their work
  • Let us know that your organization might be interested in creating a profile in the future

SPEAKERS

  • Lena Karvovskaya, VU Amsterdam
  • Jody Peters, Ecological Forecasting Initiative
  • Kathe Todd-Brown, International Soil Modeling Consortium

June 2021 Community Call

Date: Wednesday, 16 June at 11am EDT

Topic: CSCCE Summer Social

Blog posts: June’s community call

More details

ABSTRACT

Join June’s Community Call to:

  • Make new connections with CSCCE community members and staff
  • Find out more about opportunities to get involved with CSCCE programming
  • Share your news with the community
  • Have fun! 

May 2021 Community Call

Date: Wednesday, 19 May at 11am EDT

Topic: CSCCE Community Networking

Blog posts: May’s community call | Recap

More details

Abstract

In this month’s community call we will curate a networking experience to help you get to know others who are part of the CSCCE community of practice (request to join here). Please note: this month’s event required registration, which has now closed. If you are not already registered, we will not be able to accommodate you on this call, but we hope you will join us for future CSCCE community calls and other events. Keep an eye on our monthly newsletter to stay informed. 

April 2021 Community Call

Date: Wednesday, 21 April at 11am EDT

Topic: CSCCE Quarterly Programming Update

Blog posts: April’s community call | Recap

More details

ABSTRACT

Join April’s Community Call to:

  • Find out what it’s like to build out infrastructure for a new venture
  • Learn more about our online trainings and summer webinars
  • See what is going on in CSCCE research projects and working groups
  • Let us know what you’d like to see more or less of in terms of community programming

March 2021 Community Call

Date: Wednesday, 17 March at 11am EST

Topic: Virtual and hybrid meeting planning

Blog posts: March’s community call | Recap

More details

Abstract

Join March’s Community Call to:

  • Find out what works and what doesn’t at virtual meetings
  • Consider accessibility and inclusion for virtual and hybrid events
  • Brainstorm solutions to problems you have encountered, or feedback you have received from event participants
  • Connect with fellow scientific community managers and grow your professional network

February 2021 Community Call

Date: Wednesday, 17 February at 11am EST

Topic: Remote working tips

Blog posts: February’s community call | Recap

More details

Abstract

Join February’s Community Call to:

  • Acquire new strategies to manage remote working during the pandemic (and potentially beyond)
  • Learn from the experiences from other members of the CSCCE community of practice
  • Enhance your network to support you as you manage your community

Speakers

  • Isabel Mendoza, The Global Plant Council
  • Emily Lescak, Code for Science and society

January 2021 Community Call

Date: Wednesday, 27 January at 11am EST

Topic: Resilience

Blog posts: January’s community call | Recap

More details

ABSTRACT

Join January’s Community Call to:

  • Reflect on the concept of resilience and what it means for community managers
  • Acquire new practices and techniques to help mitigate burnout in your role
  • Share your own insights, experiences, and resources
  • Connect with other members of the CSCCE community of practice to build your peer support network

SPEAKERS

Jennifer Davison, Assistant Dean for Research and Director of Urban@UW, University of Washington

Stepping Beyond the Personal and Professional Silos of a Research Project Manager

Brit Myers is a Project Manager for the Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS), a non-profit membership organization with the mission of facilitating cross-boundary Arctic knowledge, research, communication, and education. She works to enhance the ability of the highly distributed Arctic research community to connect with one another and work more effectively through collaborative … Continue reading “Stepping Beyond the Personal and Professional Silos of a Research Project Manager”

Brit Myers is a Project Manager for the Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS), a non-profit membership organization with the mission of facilitating cross-boundary Arctic knowledge, research, communication, and education. She works to enhance the ability of the highly distributed Arctic research community to connect with one another and work more effectively through collaborative research programs.

Last year I was invited by Dr. Luisa Cristini  from the Alfred Wegener Institute to co-convene a session at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting.  Luisa was interested in submitting a session proposal specifically focused on issues relevant to the work of scientific project managers – a job title she and I share. Hoping to attract a larger number of abstracts to the proposed AGU session, we also agreed to reach out to the AAAS CEFP community to see if our session topic might be similar enough to their interests to warrant collaboration.  Luckily, CSCCE’s Lou Woodley and another group of #CEFP17 session conveners agreed to join us in our efforts!

However, as we drafted the combined AGU session description – and during a number of other conversations that followed – there was some genuine uncertainty about where the boundaries might stand between those focused on professional development from a “Project Manager” standpoint vs. that of a “Research Community Manager.”  For anyone with a Project Management job title, it is hard to forget that Project Management is a well-established profession with an official Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) regulated through accreditation organizations like the Project Management Institute.  Alternatively, the “Research Community Manager” is viewed by the new Center for Scientific Collaboration and Community Engagement as an “emerging profession,” distinct enough from both traditional project management and/or non-scientific online community management to justify the time and attention needed to professionalize and institutionalize the role.

Image by Pixabay: https://www.pexels.com/photo/building-ceiling-classroom-daylight-373488/
Image by Pixabay: https://www.pexels.com/photo/building-ceiling-classroom-daylight-373488/

Continue reading “Stepping Beyond the Personal and Professional Silos of a Research Project Manager”

Ten networking strategies for community managers

One task of a scientific community manager is to facilitate the activities of a community and to create opportunities for community members to engage in productive interaction. In this post CEFP2019 Fellow, Rayna Harris shares ten networking strategies for community managers. Networking is a process we use to exchange ideas and to build relationships with … Continue reading “Ten networking strategies for community managers”

One task of a scientific community manager is to facilitate the activities of a community and to create opportunities for community members to engage in productive interaction. In this post CEFP2019 Fellow, Rayna Harris shares ten networking strategies for community managers.

Networking is a process we use to exchange ideas and to build relationships with individuals that share a common interest.  In previous decades, most networking was done in-person, perhaps with the exchange of a business card or elevator pitch; however, digital communication is an increasingly common way that people network (Leek 2016). Whether you are an introvert or extrovert, the goal of this blog post is to provide community managers with a few strategies for networking to build their community and facilitate the exchange of ideas and information.

Networking strategies for social media

rayna1 Continue reading “Ten networking strategies for community managers”

Breaking the Ice Well, Part 2

Breaking the Ice Well, Part 2 2017 marked the first year of the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows Program (CEFP), funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The first cohort of Fellows was made up of 17 scientific community managers working with a diverse range of scientific communities. As they continue to develop their community engagement skills and apply some of the … Continue reading “Breaking the Ice Well, Part 2”

Breaking the Ice Well, Part 2

2017 marked the first year of the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows Program (CEFP), funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The first cohort of Fellows was made up of 17 scientific community managers working with a diverse range of scientific communities. As they continue to develop their community engagement skills and apply some of the ideas and strategies from their training, the Fellows will report back on the CSCCE blog, sharing their challenges, discoveries, and insights. Here, Fellows Allen Pope, Amber Budden, and Stefanie Butland and mentor Aidan Budd discuss facilitating interpersonal community interactions in person.

Photo credit: Jaymantri, https://www.pexels.com
Photo credit: Jaymantri, https://www.pexels.com

As we discussed last time, the purpose of icebreakers is to bring together a group of people (e.g., professionals, students, community members, etc.) and facilitate social cohesion for the purpose of having them start learning together, benefit from shared experiences, and collectively ‘produce’ during the course of the event. These introductory activities start building shared understanding within the group and allow the group to begin to work toward shared goals.

You’ve chosen an activity or two that suits your community and your specific situation – now what?

Continue reading “Breaking the Ice Well, Part 2”

Breaking the Ice Well

Breaking the Ice Well 2017 marked the first year of the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows Program (CEFP), funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The first cohort of Fellows was made up of 17 scientific community managers working with a diverse range of scientific communities. As they continue to develop their community engagement skills and … Continue reading “Breaking the Ice Well”

Breaking the Ice Well

2017 marked the first year of the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows Program (CEFP), funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The first cohort of Fellows was made up of 17 scientific community managers working with a diverse range of scientific communities. As they continue to develop their community engagement skills and apply some of the ideas and strategies from their training, the Fellows will report back on the CSCCE blog, sharing their challenges, discoveries, and insights. Here, Fellows Allen Pope, Amber Budden, and Stefanie Butland and mentor Aidan Budd discuss facilitating interpersonal community interactions in person.

Photo credit: Wikimedia
Photo credit: Wikimedia

The purpose of icebreakers is to bring together a group of people (e.g., professionals, students, community members, etc.) and facilitate social cohesion for the purpose of having them start learning together, benefit from shared experiences, and collectively ‘produce’ during the course of the event. These introductory activities start building shared understanding within the group and allow the group to begin to work toward shared goals.

As CEFP Fellow Melissa Varga wrote: “It can be a little nerve-wracking to bring people together in person, but there are some tactics that can help people ‘break the ice.’ Icebreakers are a great way to help get everyone on the same page and get people chatting to one another. They can be silly, or they can be more structured and topically focused; the goal is to get people to introduce themselves and get comfortable.”

But, as a community manager, where do you start with implementing and designing an Icebreaker during an event?

Continue reading “Breaking the Ice Well”

Strategies for survival (and maybe even some success) in a newly created community manager position

In December, we wrapped up the first year of the Community Engagement Fellows Program (CEFP), funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The first cohort of Fellows was made up of 17 scientific community managers working with a diverse range of scientific communities. We’ll be recruiting for cohort two later this year for a start date … Continue reading “Strategies for survival (and maybe even some success) in a newly created community manager position”

In December, we wrapped up the first year of the Community Engagement Fellows Program (CEFP), funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The first cohort of Fellows was made up of 17 scientific community managers working with a diverse range of scientific communities. We’ll be recruiting for cohort two later this year for a start date of January 2019.

Meanwhile, we’re continuing to share reflections from the 2017 Fellows on the blog. In today’s post, Josh Knackert shares some reflections about his experience as a first time community manager. You can catch up on all posts by the Fellows here.

Scientific community manager positions often evolve from existing roles within an organization or are fostered by an intrepid individual, passionate for this type of work, who convinces stakeholders of its necessity and their fitness for the position.  (Here’s some great advice on how to be this intrepid individual.)  Another origin story is beginning to emerge as the benefits of scientific community managers are becoming increasingly recognized and valued–organizations are realizing a need for these positions and creating them independently of the these more organic methods.

While these newly built positions offer fantastic potential for a manager and their community, they can come with some unique challenges.  Back in January 2017, I found myself in just this situation, filling a newly established community engagement role with the IceCube Collaboration at the Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center (WIPAC).

What were your most successful strategies as a first time community manager? Image credit: https://pixabay.com/en/dock-feet-footwear-jetty-mat-1846008/
What were your most successful strategies as a first time community manager?
Image credit: https://pixabay.com/en/dock-feet-footwear-jetty-mat-1846008/

Continue reading “Strategies for survival (and maybe even some success) in a newly created community manager position”

Scheduling my way to success! Time management tips for community managers

In December, we wrapped up the first year of the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows Program (CEFP), funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The first cohort of Fellows was made up of 17 scientific community managers working with a diverse range of scientific communities. We’ll be recruiting for Cohort Two later this year for a start date … Continue reading “Scheduling my way to success! Time management tips for community managers”

In December, we wrapped up the first year of the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows Program (CEFP), funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The first cohort of Fellows was made up of 17 scientific community managers working with a diverse range of scientific communities. We’ll be recruiting for Cohort Two later this year for a start date of January 2019.

Meanwhile, we’re continuing to share reflections from the 2017 Fellows on the blog. In today’s post Allen Pope shares an experiment in which he tries to solve his challenges with multi-tasking. You can catch up on all posts by the Fellows here.

Allen Pope is the Executive Secretary for the International Arctic Science Committee, an international scientific organization pursuing a mission of encouraging and facilitating cooperation in all aspects of Arctic research, in all countries engaged in Arctic research and in all areas of the Arctic region. On Twitter @PopePolar and online at about.me/allenpope & iasc.info.

I started my new job running the secretariat of the International Arctic Science Committee at the beginning of 2017. In the past year, there has been a lot for me to learn, a lot for me to get up to speed on, and a lot for me to do! After wrapping up our large annual Arctic science meetingI realized that I was spending too much time responding to emails and getting small tasks done and not enough time working on longer-term projects and thinking forwards. That might be okay for a little bit, but it isn’t sustainable in the long run.

Continue reading “Scheduling my way to success! Time management tips for community managers”