CEFP Project Teams

During their fellowship year, Community Engagement Fellows join self-selected project teams for the duration of the fellowship year.

These teams serve two key purposes:

  1. Advancing the field of community engagement within science through research and/or resource gathering and;
  2. Providing the Fellows with hands-on experiences of the challenges and rewards of (somewhat open-ended) peer-to-peer collaboration in the context of busy professional lives.

In 2017, the topics of the project teams included creating a skillswheel for scientific community engagement managers, conducting a survey of scientific organizations running advocacy or ambassador programs and producing a manual of best practices for content creation.

Full details of the CEFP2019 projects, the team members and their outputs are outlined below.


1. BUSY BEES TEAM

Project overview

In 2017, the Advocacy Ninjas team surveyed scientific community managers to understand how they run an ‘ambassador’ program or similar activities to empower community members to become more active in a community’s mission. The community managers reported the support and benefits they offer to community members, as well as the practicalities involved.

To understand whether these programs are successful and sustainable, it is important to also understand what the community members themselves report as the benefits of these programs, why they sign up in the first place, and what helps or hinders their continued contributions. The Busy Bees team has designed a survey aimed at the most dedicated community members (such as ‘ambassadors’, those who actively contribute to the community beyond consuming content) in science-related communities, whether or not they have a formalized ‘ambassador’ program.

This survey is being run in cooperation with the scientific community managers of each community. We hope to understand whether formalizing a community member’s role as an ‘ambassador’ or other title facilitates contribution. 

Team Members

  • Toby Hodges
  • Naomi Penfold
  • Korie Twiggs
  • Kathryne Woodle
  • (Lou Woodley)

2. CALM EVENTS TEAM

Project overview

Communities gather at events, big and small, in-person and online. But how do we, as community managers, ensure that the events we organize truly foster and nurture our communities? The “CALM Events” project team tackles this question by looking at the planning logistics; the content and how it is presented; diversity, equity, and inclusion at events; and the metrics gathered around events, all under the lens of building community, increasing community engagement and fostering connectedness.  

Team Members

  • Chiara Bertipaglia
  • Arne Bakker
  • Ann Meyer
  • Leslie Hsu
  • Liz Guzy
  • Megan Carter

Outputs

  • The team created a guidebook for building community through events, which is available along with other in-person events resources here.

3. DIVERSITY, EQUITY AND INCLUSION PROJECT TEAM

Project overview

We are creating a series of quick references with practical considerations for how to incorporate the principles of diversity, equity, and inclusion in scientific community-building and the community manager role.The quick reference topics will include marketing & communications, co-creating & collaborating, multilingual communities, recruitment, and meetings/events. Each quick reference will feature an overview, a story that demonstrates why viewing the topic from a DEI lens is important, a list of best-practices, reflection questions, and links to other resources.

Team Members

  • Kate Baker
  • Ellen Bechtol
  • Rayna Harris
  • Camille Santistevan

Outputs

  • The team created 4 DEI tip sheets to provide starting points for discussion and reflection. You can find the sheets on the DEI resources page.
  • They also hosted a CSCCE community call in April 2020 where the tip sheets were the focus of small group activities.

4. RESEARCH COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT THROUGH SURVEYS (R-CATS) TEAM

Project Overview

Scientific community managers regularly engage with their members to learn more about community needs &/or demographics, to plan or evaluate community work or programming, or to understand and address specific issues or opportunities.  The “Research Community Assessment Through Surveys (R-CATS)” working group is currently exploring the survey tools and methods that have been previously used by members of the CSCCE CEFP cohort, compiling recommendations and best practices for community survey use, and developing a bank of categorized survey instruments and questions to serve as a resource for other scientific community professionals.

Team Members

  • Julianna Mullen
  • Brit Myers
  • Tom Quigley

Outputs and Ongoing Work

Menu of community survey questions- survey bank of full questionnaires that have been used by community managers- general overview publication discussing the use of surveys for research community management


5. SCICOMM STORIES TEAM

Project Overview

Sci Comm Stories is a podcast by scientific community managers, for scientific community managers. Our first season features five episodes where guests will share the stories of the challenges and successes of this emerging profession which supports thousands of scientists across the globe to connect with each other and do better science. We want to enable the voices of our peers in scientific community management and bring support to the role of the community manager within scientific organizations. 

Team Members

  • Arielle Bennett
  • Shane Hanlon
  • Serah Njambi
  • Jessica Rohde
  • Jen Shook

Outputs and Ongoing Work

Episode one coming soon!